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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to
was not so much about lgbt rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, t
as an engine for change, at the moment of the civil rights -- african american civil rights movement culminating in the voting rights act, civil rights act, the beginning of the great society. and then the left said, "you know what? democracy doesn't work. let's take to the streets." well, always take to the streets, but always make sure that there are people in the halls of power who can listen to what you're saying on the streets and say, "okay, i get it. i'm going to do something about this." which means surrendering to some degree the romance of revolution. i hope that i'm not less radical in terms of what i'd like to see transformed. i believe that we can live in a more economically and socially just world than we live in. i think we have to save the planet and i think that's going to call for enormous sacrifice and a transformation of society where we really come to terms with what has to happen in order to stop global warming or reverse it. >> and can that happen without a mass movement? what lincoln did he did because before him and behind him were the abolitionists, the radi
movement, the civil rights movement, and, you know, things were happening, boys and girls. harvey's election i think made people take notice. i think that george's, george's proclivities were always in and around social justice. i know that he was raised catholic. so was i. 16 years of catholic school has made me the man i am today. [laughter] >> and harvey influenced by jewish culture, you know, i don't think it's ever been explored enough. but if you talk to every brit, you know that harvey was a very, very much impacted by the holocaust. you know, if you remember, it happened in the '40s. it's only 20 years or so since he came onto the scene. and i think he was able to transfer, you know, that tragedy and that oppression into what was happening with gay people. he was very scrappy. i wanted to acknowledge two people who were very supportive of harvey milk and george moscone, and both of them have left us and that's howard wallace and hank wilson. (applause) >> what i loved about them was, what i loved about them was they knocked back a few and really get into it with harvey abo
, civil rights attorney and law professor in washington and richard herman, new york criminal defense attorney and law professor, joins us from las vegas. avery, is there any room for gun control here? >> yeah. a ton of it. miguel, that 2008 decision that you referred to, that case really provided the open door. even justice scalia, one of the most conservative members of the court and writing for the majority, talked about unusual and dangerous weapons being permitted to be regulated. so i think heller really offers congress an opportunity to get serious, show some backbone, take advantage of the existing constitutional law, what the tragedy means, what comes out of connecticut, and take action in dealing with arms regulation. i think the opportunity is there. i think they can get it done. >> richard, what would meaningful gun control legislation or laws look like that would get by the supreme court? >> that's a great question, miguel. we're going to find that out in the next year or so. justice scalia also talked about the enshrinement of our constitutional right to bear arms. in an
. civil rights movement. our country came through each struggle stronger.
previous to this what was a study of the civil-rights south and the integration of james meredith at the university of ole miss. i like to pick out subjects that i feel have a lot of resonance to our cultural history, biography, and -- >> paul hendrickson's most recent book, national book
to that is lbj with the southern democrats passing civil rights in the '60s, which is that it was really only lbj in certain ways who could be the person to sell that vote to democrats because of where he came from. >> see, i feel like the fact that he doesn't have weight with the rest of his caucus, with the sort of -- where he needs to have it with his caucus right now is not so much ideological. i think it's a crisis of authority on the republican side. i don't think anybody, no matter where they were on the ideological number line could move republicans in a leadership role, because i don't think republicans in the house believe in following leadership anymore. anybody who is in leadership by definition is the man. they're an insurgent party. you should never go along. going along -- being part of the larger number of people doing the thing as a group marks you as suspect in the first place. i don't think anybody could hold the job. >> you know, thing is something to that culturally. the irony to that of course is newt gingrich initiated this revolution in which he changed the culture to be v
was with the civil rights legislation figured that out. both sides need to come together again, it's on president obama, harry reid and the tea party. >> jamie: let's get michael in here. michael, at this point what can the president do? he's on vacation and the american people are wondering, they're selling off houses, selling off stock. they don't know what next year looks like. >> in the interest of communication, not where the president is at christmas, but speaker boehner basically asked harry reid to figure out how to get a package that he can get 100 republican votes in the house of representatives on and harry reid is very good at figuring out the compromise that angela just talked about. i completely agree with angela's point, that the tea party has the speaker held hostage. a half dozen members or so, under no circumstances can we vote for taxes even on people over a million dollars, so i predict that we probably get over the cliff and that allows republicans to say, well, i only voted to cut taxes for 99%. i hope they get it done the second after it enacts so people don't feel it in th
worse. the revolutionary war. civil war. pearl harbor. civil rights movement. our country came through each struggle stronger.
is greater than one who is in the world. there is a wonderful spiritual i was taught in the civil rights movement. fingerprints will treat me like they used to. since i lay my burden down. way down the burden of prejudice and narrowmindedness. it's a huge burden to lay down. there will be a time when the friends you had a special treat you like they used to. and accessing what my friend teaches me about consciousness. >> to access that. i was reading this while doing my cardio in "the new york times." and i said, it came to me. we shouldn't be burning carranza, we should be reading carranza. so we put together this program of three of my closest muslim friends and talk about what it means to me. and lalo came and spoke. i asked her why she does what she does. and she said, it is to keep my consciousness of god to alive. i think that's what we're talking about in part. keeping that a lie. would which you know will never abandon you and your friends. >> is their phone you wanted to and with? in this beautiful conversation? >> why don't you do that. >> these are yours. out beyond ideas of w
, of the civil rights movement, of guns and drugs being brought into the community. so i think one of the things that our community can offer is a sense of solidarity first of all and second, community. i think community is very important. part of what's going on with this whole gun thing, it's about individual rights. we have forgotten about what community means. so when the african-american community comes together, whether in church or the community center or something like that, and we say we're going to stand against the violence, we're going to stand and march in our communities, we're going to talk about this, we're going to bring kids in and try to give events for them and all that, it is a holistic kind of way to think about how to deal with violence. i want to just say one more thing. i think this is a really important point. what people don't understand about religious people who like their guns is that guns, god and the constitution for them go all together. they are wrapped into this sort of sacred way of thinking about the nation, thinking about god, thinking about what their guns
to stand up and say, this is wrong, that discrimination was overcome the black civil rights movement for my first example and the suffrage yet movement as my second. but we're still discriminating. at the time, the phrase, equality for all -- it's ridiculous with the age discrimination regarding minimum wage in order to increase the quality in our democracy the manipulate wage needs to be standard figure for all. the thought that young people are below their infear you're colleagues and less deserving of a higher wage is outdated, ewan equal. we need to fight for civil liberties for all young people, and with that comes minimum wage for all and for that reason it should be our national campaign. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sorry. we have to wind up the debate because we have reached our allotted time. i just want before i call -- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at the back. [applause] >> bob, thank you for your support for the uk youth parliament. now i'd like to ask to conclude the debate from scotland, mr. reardon fortune to wind up the debate
're really going to do it. and sometimes it sort of takes in social movements, whether civil rights, anything historically it takes a certain amount of push at the beep ginning to get the momentum started and many years of struggling and then some other big event at the end to sort of push us over the top. and i think we may have seen that. i'm especially hopeful that gun owners and gun supporters who want to have guns can get together and say -- and the polls show this is true and say yes we want to have our guns but we also want to do sensible things too. we don't want to see our children dying. let's quit fighting about whether to have this and sit down at the table and come up with thing that is any sensible person can agree to and let's do those things. host: one more call. this one from mark in florida on our line for republicans. caller: i would just like to thank you for your rational discussion on the subject. i agree, and i pray that we've reached a tipping point like last friday i cried like you and i don't pretend to be an expert on any of this i'm just a concerned citizen. and i
act right now to try to end the civil war in syria, where 40,000 people have died. we can't just stay at home. >> axelrod: do you think people look at the notion of peace and say "look, peace is wonderful, it's noble, it's terrific for us to aspire to but i'll talk to you about peace airfare feel safe." >> it's night binary choice. peace or security. you have to have both. but a great society will always remind itself that in the final analysis, our greatness will be determined by whether or not we're striving for peace. that's why we rate lincoln and washington and martin liewcter king and franklin delano roosevelts as among the greatest leaders we ever had because they all stood for peace especially when times were very, very difficult. >> axelrod: you mentioned a number of politicians that you could tick off as pursuing peace a generation ago. are there a similar list of politicians to mention now? >> it's hard to find sitting presidents and prime ministers who are saying to their people, "my overriding goal is peace in our country or peace in the world." our politicians understand
, media conglomerates compete with one another to shock, violate and offend every standard of civilized society. by bringing an even more fox tick mix -- toxic mix or reckless behavior and criminal cruelty right into our homes every minute, every day, every hour of every single year. a child growing up in america today witnesses 16,000 murders and 200,000 acts of violence by the time he or she reaches the ripe old age of 18. and throughout it all, too many in the national media, their corporate owners and their stockholders act as silent enablers, if not complicit co-conspirators. rather than face their own moral failings, the media demonize gun owners. [inaudible conversations] >> the reckless behavior coming from the nra! the nra has blood on its hands! the nra has blood on its hands! shame on the nra! ban assault weapons now! ban assault weapons now! nra, ban assault weapons now! stop killing our children! stop the reckless behavior of the nra! we need gun control now! >> rather than face their own moral failings, the media demonize lawful gun owners, amplify their cries for more law
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with
right term, you we you will a know what i'm talking about, where you can spray bullets and kill 20 people in a minute. this is not the way a civilized society should operate. >> funny you mention that because on friday, the n.r.a.'s wayne laperriere said exactly we need more gun training and more guards and all of these things. i guarantee he that part of the press conference and statement won't get covered at all. i think that the media do have an anti-gun agenda and doesn't follow policies at all and have it on their own and all other ways to deal with scoot shootings and mass violence will be sunk below the radar. >> and the run knives, why don't we outlaw lives and they don't do mass killings with knives. >> why not outlaw mental illness-- >> we know what the solutions are, we've discussed them for years. >> i don't know-- >> no, no, we can make it hard tower kill that many people in a minute. we can do that. as the president said and i think taking note of and worth covering, we can do better. >> i think that china can control-- >> you might note the american people who do hav
years in which he can have his way over republicans who are right now in a civil war in the house. >> i mean, if that's the plan that it's working, because as charles mentioned chuckle head you have members of the g.o.p. calling other members of the g.o.p. chuckle heads, the 40 or 50 tea party members for not doing anything so there is a civil war. >> the idea that the president was trying to foment civil war in the g.o.p. maybe that's what happened. i don't know if he was a diabolical genius and know that he is creating that. >> the president knew if he does nothing that it's on them, the house controls the purse strings and if he does nothing, these things are going to go into place anyway. >> i have always disagreed with the notion that the country will blame republicans. they might in the short-term in the six to eight months to follow but your legacy will be one of two recessions in both terms, mr. president. so, yeah. go ahead and say they will blame republicans. it's going to be on your presidency. back in recession. >> send us your comments on all of this, please. we have to tel
, and offend every standard of civilized society by bringing an even more toxic max of reckless behavior and criminal cruelty right into our homes every minute, every day, every hour, of every single year. a child growing up in america today witnesses 16,000 murders and 200,000 acts of violence by the time he or she reaches the ripe old age of 18. throughout it all, to many in the national media, their corporate owners, and their stockholders, act as silent enablers if not complice it co- conspirators. rather than face their own moral failings, the media demonize to gun owners. >> reckless behavior becoming from the nra. the nra has blood on its ads. -- ahands. the nra has blood on its hands. shame on the nra ban assault weapons now. ban on assault weapons now. stop killing our children. stop the reckless behavior of the nra. we need gun control now. >> rather than face their own moral failings, the media demonizes the gun owners, amplifies their cries for more laws, and fills the national media with misinformation and dishonest thinking that only delay meaningful action in all that guar
-- this is the time for considered discussion, for a civil debate. but what the nra has been proposing and has been talking about will not lead to that. >> all right. certainly a lot of fire behind this debate. maria core dona, amy holmes, thank you very much. nice to see you both. >> thank you. >> happy holidays. >> same to you, as well. see you next year. >> absolutely. >> all right. thank you. >> all right. >>> a young author raising money to help other kids who are just like him. how a rare genetic disease inspired this little boy to give back. >>> i want to share a story now about a young author with a rare genetic disease. he's raising money to help other kids who are just like him. here's dr. sanjay gupta with today's "human factor." >> reporter: 9-year-old evan moss is a boy who seemingly only cares about one simple thing. >> all of these, all filled with pokemon cards. >> reporter: unfortunately, his life isn't so simple. >> when evan was just a couple weeks old, he started having these little shaky movements. it was one arm that would just twitch a little bit. and it would last a few seco
, this crisis is long term. maybe we do need to get a little more aggressive especially when civil liberties have apparently been infringed upon. i also have the observation that government lawyers, i would say this. when you are the government you have an obligation to make things right. if you have done some the wrong he should make it right. it is not a good comparison but i remember when i was in the military, medical malpractice cases, if we were wrong we figure out how big the check was going to be, that is the right thing to do when you are the government. this is an important question and i urge you to take a look. >> judge brown elevated, make a difference? >> i think there would be a difference of opinion, correctly decided in the first interest and whether subsequent practical experience had led one to the conclusion, i fundamentally agree with what charlie was saying about i started at the justice department office of legal counsel after september 11th. i thought our was going to do establishment cause but national security, counterterrorism, international law, we sat down and lo
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)